SUCCESS IN THE ARTS THROUGH CREATIVE BUSINESS SKILLS

Kate Spencer offers courses and one-on-one consultations for artists. Feel free to contact her by email to enquire about upcoming courses, or ask specific questions.

If you need help with writing a press release or proposal, you are struggling with your CV or artists statement, help is available. Any area of business for the Arts Industries can be discussed.

Most importantly, when you are unsure about a business arrangement, or how to take the next step, it is time to seek advice. You may not know who to ask, but you know someone who knows someone. Rather than take general advice available on the web, you'll want to discuss the specific situation, as good advice will vary according to the circumstances. Make the call to speak to Kate directly, you will be very glad you did!

The following are some targeted tips for different areas of practice in the Arts.

PERFORM

Documenting your events and general activities is an important practice for your promotion to sponsors and the general public. You will want to be able to show what you are capable of, along with what you have achieved in the past. Think about what you are in a position to demonstrate in relation to size of the crowd attending, different locations, types of participation, successful outcomes. This is only one form of documentation. Consider the creative ways you can record the experiences and reactions of others, taking the impact of the occasion outside of your own experience into the public domain.

Digital still and video photography can be loaded on-line immediately, and made available directly to individuals of your choice or in the form of an announcement through larger email networks of information sites such as Facebook, Bebo, Myspace or Twitter, and of course www.artists.co.nz.

Plan your documentation in advance. Decide what types or records would serve you best in the future, and be prepared to get the best results. Delegate the task to someone who will have the time and skill to do the best job possible under current circumstances, and budget for the costs. There is no way to regain a moment that has past. As time goes on you can be more particular, and cull what you decide to keep or discard.

Documentation is cheap and easy to achieve with modern technology, remember to give it some thought. Make sure you have more than one copy for your records, three - five would serve most projects. One of the advantages of www.artists.co.nz over networking sites is that you have the ability to edit you own material, and remove it entirely at will. Think carefully about what you want the whole world to have access to.

VISUAL ART

As an alternative to putting photos of your art work directly on the web, which makes what you have done vulnerable to being copied or imitated around the world, consider uploading documentation of the total exhibition or larger process.

The activity of producing or installing the pieces you have done. This will create more interest and a reason to come along. People will be more intrigued to come see the result when they know something about the process. Having seen the finished work already, can create a corresponding lack of need to investigate further.

LITERARY ART

Including writing about your own work in the third person not only adds credibility and credential to your achievements from an external perspective, it is also a healthy exercise in separating yourself from your craft.

Consider having your biggest fan write a portion of an artist's statement or media release. Who do you know that writes well and would be enthusiastic or flattered to contribute to your public representation? If you write it yourself, have others read it to make sure it makes sense, and you have maintained grammatical consistency.

The natural tendency is to revert back to 'I' and "me" statements about half way through the body of the text you are writing. Edit by removing any unnecessary words. Can some sentences be shorted, or eliminated to create powerful communication?

Getting Started

These sections of general introductory remarks are based on the initial situations artists generally encounter. It may seem like common sense, but these are some things people generally learn the hard way, or may need to be reminded of under pressure.

Remember when you were just getting started? It can take years to arrive at the simple aspects that you have been over looking. Feel free to contact us with any questions you have.

We can certainly save you valuable time.

For further information contact:
KATE SPENCER 
roaming mobile (+642) 137 0096
email: kate.s@artists.co.nz